Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag

Melbourne-based artist Daniel Agdag is an award-winning creator of stop-motion films.

For his series ‘Sets for a Film I’ll never make’, he created each detailed piece entirely from cardboard and PVA glue.

"It began as pure necessity. I had a small space to work in and it was a very convenient. I just needed a blade, a ruler, some cardboard and a cutting mat."

"I did fine art originally but I majored in photography and I minored in painting so I wasn't making anything sculptural. I went back to school after a period and did filmmaking but the cardboard is something that is very much self-taught."

"The very first model I made was a traffic light. It was a very complex traffic light and I really liked the cables and junction boxes."

"I don't draw; I intuitively cut the cardboard and begin with a general idea of what I want to make. From that the proportions develop themselves and I find myself chopping and changing pieces in and out, then it pretty much forms in front of me. That's why I describe it as 'sketching with cardboard,' because it's not planned."

"I mainly use an actual surgical scalpel that doctors use, and number 11 blades. I also use a very standard hobby knife and that's pretty much it: just a couple of blades, a pair of scissors, and a metal ruler to cut straight lines."

"I love the fact that I can work in a small space with it. I actually like the limitation of the material because I find that alleviates any limitation I have in my imagination. Because the material is so pliable and so useful, I can create anything I want and I like the fact that I don't need fancy equipment or tools to manipulate the creations that I want to make. I like the accessible nature of it."

"When I build these little sculptures, in my mind, there's a very clear logic as to why all of the parts are in the position they're in."

"They build up slowly so one part leads to another. I don't plan it; I just start with an element that I really like."

"It is sometimes extremely hard to know when I've come to the end of the piece. When I get to a certain stage I like to have a look at it, think about it and dwell on it quite a bit. It is very hard to find a finish point. You always feel like you should go back and refine something some more –- like in drawing."

Check his website:

Source: notesontheroad


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